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The Secret to Split Sofa

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 60% (10 Votes)

We are working on a piece about forgotten psychedelic bands from the 60s and one of the side effects of this research is our discovery of the richness of the current neo-psychedelic genre. Split Sofa is one of those bands, sounding very like Pink Floyd in places and more traditional in others.  Split Sofa is actually a forgotten—or overlooked, rather—band of the moment, though.

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This is Not Normal Music: Willis Earl Beal

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 82% (6 Votes)

Sometimes weird is good.  It’s just nice to hear something unidentifiable, something you have to ask yourself about.  Is this delta blues? Rap? Folk? It’s not that clear what genre Willis Earl Beal is in, though it is clear the work is authenticwhatever it is.

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The Attitude of a Goth Bikini: The Growlers

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 94% (14 Votes)

Somewhere in my Internet travels I noted that The Growlers were categorized as Beach Goth, and I think whoever came up with that category deserves a special place in the Category-Coinage Hall of Fame.  It doesn’t sum them up of course, but it does give us a notion about the peculiar amalgam that is their sound.

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These are Better Days—Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 98% (17 Votes)

Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros started as a music collective led by Alex Ebert (vocals, guitar, percussion, piano) and Jade Castrinos (vocals, guitar) and has as many as twelve members at any given time.  That variety of contributors certainly broadens the range of their sound, with clear influences from Leonard Cohen, Pink Floyd, Beatles, Kinks, Bowie, along with influences from the general 60s and 70s sound—even a bit of Rocky Horror on “Let’s Get High,” as well as many of those other listed influences, and some Fine Young Cannibals on “Please!”—that’s the range.  And if you like those artists and those times, you should really give Edward Sharpe and the Magnetic Zeros  a considered chance. 

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