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It’s So Twentieth Century: The Boomtown Rats’ Tonic for the Troops

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 91% (8 Votes)

Nothing can make a guy feel older than listening to an old favourite song that heralds a time now far in the past.  In Asia’s “Heat of the Moment,” John Wetton sings “And now you find yourself in ‘82”; at the beginning of Styx’s “Borrowed Time,” Dennis de Young shouts “Don’t look now, but here come the eighties!”

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Coldplay Live 2003

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 93% (12 Votes)

The obvious Then-Album to compare to Coldplay’s latest, Ghost Stories, is Parachutes—one of the best debut albums of all time. Still, praising Parachutes would be a silly undertaking given that most listeners give it five stars and always have.  The most useful album of their canon to compare to Ghost Stories is Live 2003 because of its authenticity, because of its proof that they can actually perform the songs they record.  And it may also be one of their more ignored albums.

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Listen to the Nazareth ‘N’s: Loud ‘N’ Proud

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 95% (4 Votes)

Many Nazareth fans have never owned a real Nazareth album.  Many have settled for the brilliant Greatest Hits from 1975. In the era of 8-tracks it was ubiquitous, its wrinkling cover sitting on the dash or seats of any car worthy of making it up and down a main street. The rumour was it actually contained all the good material from Nazareth’s first six albums.   Greatest Hits, with not a single weak tune,  still serves as something of an advertisement for their first releases, but does it really contain all of their best material? 

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Narrow Black Ties Over Hearts of Glass

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 Rating 69% (11 Votes)

“Hanging on the Telephone” probably makes no sense to the cell phone generation.  Deborah Harry is singing about a now weird aspect of a departed world of phone booths.  It’s the song that starts off Blondie’s best album, 1978’s Parallel Lines.  “Hanging on the Telephone” set the tone for the album, tons of attitude in a mix of New Wave and straight-up pop, with punk undertones.

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